Financing Small Business Enterprises

Sources of Information

A BusinessBrief

Compiled by

Angela Wilson
Carolyn Larson
Shari Jacobson

Humanities and Social Sciences Division
Library of Congress
Washington, 1994
_________________________________________________________________

FINANCING SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISES:

SOURCES OF INFORMATION
A BusinessBrief

Contents

INTRODUCTION

SCOPE OF THIS GUIDE

Library of Congress SUBJECT HEADINGS

SECTIONS ON Financing CONTAINED IN GENERAL GUIDES
TO STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS

OVERVIEWS DISCUSSING VARIOUS TYPES OF FINANCING

SOURCES DISCUSSING SPECIFIC TYPES OF FINANCING
Federal Funding Programs
State Funding
Bank Loans
Venture Capital
Nonprofit Organizations
Funding targeted to specific groups

EXPORT FINANCING

FINANCING FOR BUYING A BUSINESS

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR THE SMALL BUSINESS

AVOIDING SCAMS

FREE OR INEXPENSIVE MATERIALS

ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING SERVICES

PERIODICALS

REPRESENTATIVE JOURNAL ARTICLES

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION

_________________________________________________________________

INTRODUCTION

Small business and entrepreneurship form an integral part of a healthy
national economy. In recent years various factors, such as the impact of
privatization and specialization in industry and corporate restructuring
and downsizing as influenced by new management theories such as Thomas
Peters’ “Liberation Management,” (1) have combined to encourage the
emergence of many small and medium-sized companies. At the same time new
opportunities for such companies are seen in the wooing of small business
into exporting and international trade, and the creative efforts of major
corporations in the area of business community development. The valuable
contributions of such small businesses are widely recognized by all sectors
of society, as can be seen by the many efforts to aid small businesses
taking place at the federal, state, and local level. Such efforts range
from new rulings of the Securities and Exchange Commission simplifying its
filing requirements for small businesses making stock offerings to the
public to a revamping of business school curriculums to include the study
of small business entrepreneurship.

Yet, in spite of this increased awareness, recent news coverage, while
acknowledging a current economic climate of low interest rates and
available money supply, indicates that access to capital continues to be
the most difficult challenge for small business owners. Recent newspaper
articles point to several reasons why, even under optimal conditions,
entrepreneurs are still not successful at getting financing: banks, by the
very nature of their business, are resistant to the high-risk loans which
many small businesses represent; potential entrepreneurs may lack the
business savvy to articulate what they need in business terminology; and
such inexperienced business persons may also fail to present a well-thought
out long-range alternative plan to cover emergencies and other
contingencies. Factors such as these all contribute to the decision of a
would-be financing source not to commit money to a particular business.

To help small business owners meet these challenges, the Library of
Congress Business Research Center, with the generous assistance of the Lowe
Foundation, has prepared this “BusinessBrief” on financing small business
enterprises. Planned as the first of a series of “BusinessBriefs” targeted
to the entrepreneur, this brief is intended as a guide to representative
sources of information on obtaining funding for both the newly formed and
the expanding small business. As such, the focus has been on recently
published books and current journal articles that will be of immediate,
practical use to the practitioner.

While this brief is intended to provide accurate information regarding
sources of information about obtaining financing for small business, it is
not intended as a substitute for professional legal, accounting, or other
services, and users of this list are encouraged to obtain the services of
competent professionals in these fields as needed.

A variety of sources is included in this “BusinessBrief.” In some
cases, financing is the topic of entire books, while in others only certain
chapters or sections, which have been noted, are devoted to the topic. The
audiences to whom these volumes are addressed likewise vary. For example,
the business person considering a start-up is the focus of a number of
these titles including Timmons’ “Planning and Financing the New Venture,”
Berle’s “Raising Start-Up Capital for Your Company,” and Lindsey’s “StartUp
Money: Raise What You Need for Your Small Business,” which is specifically
addressed to business persons seeking to borrow less than $100,000. At the
other end of the scale is “The Ernst & Young Guide to Raising Capital,”
which covers in detail the problems and capital requirements of companies
moving out of the start-up phase and considering various options for
expansion, while Blechman and Levinson address “Guerrilla Financing” to any
new or established small business seeking $1 million or less.

These publications outline an array of sources for financing available
to the small business person. A number of the publications included on this
list are useful starting points for anyone looking for an overall picture
of the traditional sources of small business funding–such as family,
friends, personal funds, banks, and venture capitalists. These discussions
of the major features of debt and equity financing, or some combination of
the two, range from brief overviews such as the two page pamphlet “How To
Raise Money for a Small Business,” (FF1) issued by the Small Business
Administration to extended discussions such as those in Timmons’ volume
Planning and Financing the New Venture or Berle’s “Raising Start-Up Capital
for Your Company.” In the section on “Avoiding Scams” a number of titles
such as Graham Mott’s “How To Recognize and Avoid Scams, Swindles, and
Ripoffs” and M. Allen Henderson’s “Rip-offs and Swindles; Money for
Nothing,” outline financing schemes which the small businessman would do
well to recognize and avoid.

Reflecting the economic realities of the 1990s, many recent books and
articles note the growing difficulties which small businesses face in
obtaining traditional bank and equity financing and include financing
strategies variously described as “atypical,” “alternative,” “avant
guarde,” or “creative.” Some of these have combined important elements from
traditional methods with alternative methods to form a synergistic approach
to acquiring start-up capital. Examples include networking by banks at
community and business association meetings, micro-loan programs which are
mostly offered to low-income borrowers and usually require little or no
collateral, and mentor-protege programs by major corporations that provide
technical assistance for small business. Also discussed in current news
articles are “temporary co-ownership” programs sponsored by corporations
that provide funding needed to open up “outlets” for the corporation,
thereby promoting community business development, often with options for
the entrepreneurs to begin buying back the stock as soon as the business
becomes profitable. Other creative sources for funds mentioned are
lotteries and contests designed by enterprising individuals to raise money
for their businesses. In addition, there are grants and loans available
from various nonprofit and government sources as described in some detail
by Blum in “Free Money for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs.” Such funds
are often restricted to specific areas of need in a state such as disaster
relief or to specific groups needing assistance, such as the elderly.
Finally, mention is made of various “guerilla-type” financing methods such
as the use of one’s personal credit cards as sources of funds.

“The Ernst and Young Guide to Raising Capital”–with chapters on going
public, exempt offerings of securities, venture capital, joint ventures and
licensing, leasing, government loans and grants, divestitures, special
techniques for financing research and development, cash management,
management buyouts, employee stock options, franchising, and tax
planning–provides an overview of current trends in small business
financing. Several other titles in this “BusinessBrief” focus almost
exclusively on alternative financing strategies. These include Tuller’s
“When the Bank Says No! Creative Financing for Closely Held Business,”
Lindsey’s “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to…Capital Over 150 Proven Ways to
Finance New and Growing Businesses” and Blechman and Levinson’s “Guerrilla
Financing.” Tuller looks, as his title promises, at a variety of ways to
raise capital that do not involve incurring debt through a commercial bank
loan. Lindsey’s volume, directed to executives of companies with annual
revenues of under $25 million, includes discussions of incubators, going
public overseas, factoring, bartering, and commercial paper, and various
stock options. Blechman and Levinson in “Guerrilla Financing” place a
strong emphasis on “partnering” or finding an “angel” who is interested in
investing in particular types of businesses. These authors also briefly
describe 101 nontraditional financing techniques.

Techniques especially useful for rescuing the troubled company form
the basis for Woeltjen’s book “Surviving the Credit Crunch of the ’90’s;
Rescuing Your Small Business from Meltdown and Making It a Success.” To
illustrate his points, Woeltjen follows the actions of the executive of a
hypothetical company as he moves his firm from near insolvency to financial
success. Woeltjen leads his fictitious executive through emergency measures
to regain cash control while he buys time to do a thorough analysis of what
went wrong, followed by financial planning for the future utilizing a
variety of techniques similar to those mentioned above. Another title
covering similar ground is Silver’s “The Turnaround Survival Guide:
Strategies for the Company in Crisis.”

In addition to creative financing techniques, several other trends can
be seen in these publications. One is the number of titles addressed to
specific groups of individuals such as retirees, women, or members of
various ethnic groups, who may seek to satisfy a life-long dream by
becoming entrepreneurs. Essays which speak directly to the special problems
and opportunities of particular groups include the chapter on “Special
Groups” in Klein’s “Handbook on Building a Profitable Business,” articles
such as Sharon Nelton’s “On the Horizon: More Investment in Women,” and
Gustav Berle’s book, “Retiring to Your Own Business: How You Can Launch a
Satisfying, Productive, and Prosperous Second Career.”

Another trend seen in a number of these publications–
discussions of offshore, or foreign, sources of financing for the American
entrepreneur–reflects the increasing globalization of the American
economy. Lindsey, for example, in “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to–Capital,”
discusses offshore financing sources involving licensing, venture capital,
partnerships and going public in overseas contexts. A number of other
titles in the section on “Export Financing” in the “BusinessBrief” are
devoted exclusively to this topic.

Also well represented in these volumes is information on government
programs available to small businesses. In addition to the titles devoted
entirely to this topic which are listed under the sections on “State
Funding” and “Federal Funding/Programs” of this brief, the “Small Business
Sourcebook: the Entrepreneur’s Resource,” contains extensive listings of
federal and state programs available to assist the small business person.

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is the primary source
within the federal government for financial assistance to small business.
The agency administers a loan guarantee program for those small businesses
meeting its criteria and has a number of other programs available for
veterans, handicapped persons, minorities, and disaster victims. The SBA
maintains an 800 number, the SBA Hotline, which responds to approximately
250,000 calls per year from business persons around the country, (2) and
issues numerous publications of interest to small business. In cooperation
with the states, the SBA also helps fund Small Business Development Centers
(SBDC’s), located in each state, to provide direct assistance to
entrepreneurs. The SBA also sponsors the Service Corps of Retired
Executives (SCORE), a national organization of retired executives who
volunteer their time to counsel small business persons.

In addition to the SBA, other government agencies also administer
specific grant or loan programs of interest to the entrepreneur seeking
funding. Detailed information on these programs can be found in the
“Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance” published by the U.S. Office of
Management and the Budget. A number of the titles included under the
section Federal Funding/Programs in this BusinessBrief identify and discuss
some of the governmental programs of greatest interest to the small
business person. Laurie Blum, in “Free Money for Small Businesses and
Entrepreneurs,” includes the number of each program from the “Catalog of
Federal Domestic Assistance” for easy reference should additional
information about any program be sought.

Many other programs, such as those sponsored by colleges and many
trade associations, are also available to assist new business enterprises.
Additional information can be found in numerous books, magazines,
audiovisuals, and other nonprint items that have been produced by these
organizations as well as by individual business executives and
entrepreneurs. An extensive listing of such sources can be found in the
“Small Business Sourcebook: the Entrepreneur’s Resource.”

Regardless of the specific financing techniques discussed, certain
themes are repeated throughout many of the publications listed in this
brief. Chief among these is the emphasis on the importance of
self-assessment in determining what it takes to be an entrepreneur coupled
with admonitions to those seeking financing to expect rejection before
finally winning approval of their financing proposals. These sources are in
general agreement that entrepreneurs need to start their search for
financing with a close examination of themselves and their own companies or
proposed businesses. To this end, there are frequent discussions of the
importance of developing business and/or finance plans, of placing one’s
existing business in the best financial position possible by effecting
economies in the day-to-day operations of the company, and of obtaining
competent legal and financial counsel. Likewise stress is placed on the
importance of comparing one’s business or potential business to industry
standards for the same or a related industry or to a public company in the
field which has disclosed financial information.

Along with the importance of analyzing one’s own business is the
importance of analyzing one’s requests for financing from the point of view
of the potential funding source. Tuller, in “When the Bank Says No!
Creative Financing for Closely Held Business,” urges the entrepreneur to
learn the language of finance and devotes a chapter to the topic. He and
Lindsey, in “Start-Up Money: Raise What You Need for Your Small Business,”
along with others, address the purpose for which the loan is intended and
discuss types of financing sources most suited for those purposes. Several
volumes, including “Lending to Different Industries: Practical Articles on
Making Loans to Selected Industries” and “Businesses–a Collection Taken
from the Journal of Commercial Bank Lending” and “Credit Considerations:
Financial and Credit Characteristics of Selected Industries,” discuss loan
criteria by industry from the point of view of the lender.

Many of the sources included in this “BusinessBrief” contain examples
of forms required for IRS, SBA and other organizations, sample business
loan applications and proposals, various checklists for buying or starting
a business or franchise, worksheets for calculating your own resources, and
numerous charts, tables, and glossaries that may be useful to the business
person moving through the various levels in the financing process. To cite
just a few examples, Schilit, in “The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Preparing a
Winning Business Plan and Raising Venture Capital,” includes extensive
worksheets for developing a business plan; Timmons, in “Planning and
Financing the New Venture,” includes appendices on “Business Plan Guide,”
as well as an “Outline of an Investment Agreement,” “Sample Terms Sheet,”
and “Sample Vesting and Stock Restriction Agreement.” Blum, in the
introduction to “Free Money for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs,”
includes sample grant proposals for profit and nonprofit organizations,
while Woeltjen provides a “Sample Offering Memorandum for New Stock Issues
to the Public.” A few titles, such as Fred Fry’s “Entrepreneurship: a
Planning Approach” and Arthur H. Kuriloff’s “How To Start Your Own
Business– and Succeed,” include software to assist in preparing a
financial plan for the business.

As these sources make plain, acquiring seed money and initial capital
for start-up is likely to be only the beginning of an on-going process of
financing one’s business; the need to acquire financing becomes especially
critical for the survival of existing and growing companies as they move
beyond seed money and start-up, and seek other types of financing such as
second round, mezzanine, and initial public offerings. Moreover, while some
businesses may go through only one or two phases in their search for
financing, others may go through all phases of the process more than once
as the company grows.

Finally, because there is no magic formula, method, or program that
will automatically secure financing for a new or growing company, the
process can be challenging and sometimes frustrating. It can also be
exciting and rewarding. Choosing the appropriate methodology for gaining
financial backing, utilizing the best information gained from research, and
developing well thought-out business and contingency plans are the best
strategies to facilitate the successful acquisition of funds.

(1) Thomas J. Peters. “Liberation Management: Necessary Disorganization for
the Nanosecond Nineties.” New York: A.A. Knopf, 1992.

(2) Gustav Berle. “SBA Hotline Answer Book.” New York: John Wiley, 1992.
p.[1].

_________________________________________________________________

A BusinessBrief

FINANCING SMALL BUSINESS ENTERPRISES:
SOURCES OF INFORMATION

SCOPE of this guide

This publication is intended as a guide to representative sources of
information on obtaining funding for the newly formed or expanding small
business. As such the focus has been on sources that will be of immediate,
practical use to the practitioner rather than on sources intended for the
scholarly study of small business.

Library of Congress SUBJECT HEADINGS

Small business–finance
Home-based businesses
New business enterprises–finance
Family corporations–management
Self-employed
Minority business enterprises–finance
Venture capital
Small business investment companies
Business incubators
Entrepreneurs
Federal aid to minority business enterprises
Federal aid to women-owned business enterprises

search also under specific groups or industries such as:

Indians of North America–business enterprises
Mexican American business enterprises
Afro-American business enterprises
Women-owned business enterprises
Handicapped-owned business enterprises
Student-owned business enterprises
retirees–employment
Minority-owned architectural firms

_________________________________________________________________
SECTIONS ON FINANCING

CONTAINED IN GENERAL GUIDES TO STARTING A SMALL BUSINESS

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

* Applegate, Jane. Succeeding in Small Business: the 101 Toughest Problems
and How To Solve Them. New York: Plume, 1992. pp. 69-97
HF5386.A626 1992
91 -39508

Berle, Gustav. Planning and Forming Your Company. New York: Wiley, 1990.
pp. 19-55; Appendix I-II. HD62.5.B4815 1990
89-22430

* Clark, Scott A. Beating the Odds: 10 Smart Steps to Small Business
Success. New York: AMACOM c1991. pp. 3-49, 55-97,
102-157, 162-205. HD62.5.C59 1991
90-56187

* Cohen, William A. The Entrepreneur and Small Business Problem Solver: an
Encyclopedic Reference and Guide. 2nd ed. New York: Wiley, c1990. pp.
28-66, 90- 103, Appendix II- VII
HD62.7.C63 1990 SSRR B&E
89-32064

* Eyler, David R. Starting and Operating a Home-Based Business.
New York: Wiley, 1990. pp. 209-213, 227-231. HD62.5.E95 1990
89-36240

* Fallek, Max. How To Set Up Your Own Small Business. Minneapolis, MN:
American Institute of Small Business. c1991. Vol. 1, section 5-1.
HD62.7.F35 1991
89-84218

Fry, Fred L. Entrepreneurship: a Planning Approach. Minneapolis/St. Paul,
MN: West Pub. Co., 1993. Parts 5-7. Includes 1 computer disk (3 1/2 inch)
System requirements: IBM PC or compatible; 512K MS-DOS
HD62.5.F79 1993
92-26326

* Jacobson, Ruth. Your Own Shop: How To Open and Operate a Successful
Retail Business. Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Liberty Hall Press, c1991. pp.
10-17, 168-176. HD62.5.J33 1990 SSRR B&E
90-40307

* Klein, Fred. Building a Profitable Business. Seattle, WA: Entrepreneurial
Workshops Publications, c1990. pp. 3-1 – 3-20;
4-1 – 4-57; 5-1 – 5-41. MLCM 93/03015(H)
89-83407

Kuriloff, Arthur H. How To Start Your Own Business–and Succeed. 2nd ed.
New York: McGraw Hill, 1993. Chapters 10, 11, 14, 15 and Appendix A.
Includes 1 computer disk (5 1/4 inch)
HD62.5.K86 1993 MRCRR
92-25288

Luther, William M. The Start-Up Business Plan. New York: Prentice
Hall,1991. pp. 189-202, Appendix. HD62.7.L88 1991
91 -25659

Maul, Lyle R. The Entrepreneur’s Road Map to Business Success, by Lyle Maul
and Dianne Craig Mayfield, rev. ed. Alexandria, VA: Saxtons River
Publications, 1992. pp. 127-177.
HD62.5.M37 1992 SSRR B&E
92-50275

McLaughlin, Harold J. The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Building a Better
Business Plan: A Step-by-Step Approach. New York: Wiley, 1992. pp. 207-220.
HD30.28.M3853 1992
91-34353

Merrill, Ronald E. The New Venture Handbook, by Ronald E. Merrill and Henry
D. Sedgwick. New York: Amacom, 1993. pp. 207-227; 259-286.
HD62.5.M46 1993
92-27378

Schmoke, L. Joseph. Vital Business Secrets for New and Growing Companies,
by L. Joseph Schmoke and Richard R. Allen. Homewood, IL: Dow Jones-Irwin,
1989. pp. 120-161. HD62.5.S353 1989
88-21762

* Timmons, Jeffry A. New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship in the 1990s.
3rd ed. Homewood, IL: Irwin, 1990. pp. 399-489. HD62.5.T55
89-37898

Vesper, Karl H. New Venture Mechanics. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall,
1993. pp. 137-205; pp 310-[362]. HD62.5.V46 1993
91-43340
_________________________________________________________________

OVERVIEWS DISCUSSING VARIOUS

TYPES OF FINANCING

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

# Alarid, William. Money Sources for Small Business: How You Can Find
Private, State, Federal, and Corporate Financing. Santa Maria, CA: Puma
Publishing Co., 1990. 222p. HG4027.7.A43 SSRR B&E
90-45299

# Blechman, Bruce. Guerrilla Financing: Alternative Techniques to Finance
any Small Business, by Bruce Blechman and Jay Conrad Levinson. Boston:
Houghton Mifflin, 1991. 343p. HG4027.7.B55 1991
90-24203

# Berle, Gustav. Raising Start-Up Capital for Your Company. New York:
Wiley, c1990. 244p. HG4027.6.B47 1990
89-22509

* Garner, Daniel R. The Ernst & Young Guide to Raising Capital, by Daniel
R. Garner, Robert R. Owen, and Robert P. Conway. New York: Wiley, 1991. pp.
1-12, 49-208, 215-251. HG4061.G37 1991
90-43834

# Heath, Gibson. Funding Options for Small Business. Denver, CO: DBA/USA
Press, 1990. 112p. HG4027.7.H42 1990
90-81933

* Lindsey, Jennifer. The Entrepreneur’s Guide to–Capital: Over
150 Proven Ways to Finance New and Growing Businesses, rev. ed. Chicago,
IL: Probus Publishing Co., c1990. pp. 13-34; 47-70; 77-136.
HG4061.L52 1990
89-70265

# Lindsey, Jennifer. Start-Up Money: Raise What You Need for Your Small
Business. New York: Wiley, c1989. 247p. HG4027.7.L56 1989
88-32626

# Mathewson, G. Bradley. Asking For Money: The Entrepreneur’s
Guide to the Financing Process. Orlando, FL.: Financial Systems Associates.
1989. 261p. HG4027.6.M38 1989
89-80878

# Raising Money for Your Small Business. Dallas/Fort Worth,: National
Association for the Self-Employed. 1989. 45p.
HG4027.7.R35 1989
90-225246

# Seglin, Jeffrey L. Financing Your Small Business. New York: McGraw Hill,
1992. 258p. HG4027.7.S44 1990
90-30383

Silver, A. David. The Turnaround Survival Guide: Strategies for the Company
in Crisis. Chicago: Dearborn Financial Pub., 1992. 339p.
HD58.8.S55 1992
91-44496

# Timmons, Jeffry A. Planning and Financing the New Venture. Acton, MA:
Brick House Publishing Co., Inc. 1990. 188p. HD62.5.T56 1990
89-22115

# Tuller, Lawrence W. Financing the Small Business. New York: Prentice Hall
Press, 1991. 280p. HG4027.7.T85 1991
91-3166

# Tuller, Lawrence W. When the Bank Says No! Creative Financing for Closely
Held Business. Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Liberty Hall Press, 1991. 306p.
HG4027.3.T85 1991
90-24558

* Woeltjen, Lance H. Surviving the Credit Crunch of the ’90’s”: Rescuing
Your Small Business from Meltdown and Making It a Success. Radnor, PA:
Chilton Book Co., c1991. pp. 85-131.
HG4027.7.W64 1990
90-55319
_________________________________________________________________

SOURCES DISCUSSING SPECIFIC TYPES OF FUNDING

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

Federal Funding/Programs

* Alarid, William M. Free Help from Uncle Sam to Start Your Own Business
(or Expand the One You Have), by William Alarid and Gustav Berle. 3rd ed.
Santa Maria, CA: Puma Pub. Co., c1992. pp. 93-131; 134-140; Appendix 8.
HD2346.U5A63 1992 SSRR B&E
91-34319

# Blum, Laurie. Free Money for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs. 3rd ed.
New York: J. Wiley & Sons, c1992. 293p.
HG4027.7.B58 1992 SSRR B&E
92-19847

Chelekis, George C. The Action Guide to Government Grants, Loans, and
Giveaways. New York: Perigee Books, c1993. 510p.
HG177.5.U6 C438 1993
92-38818

# O’Hara, Patrick. SBA Loans: A Step by Step Guide. New York: Wiley, c1989.
230p. HG4027.7.043 1989 SSRR B&E
88-36676

* SBA Lending Made Easy. Washington, DC: American Bankers Association,
c1990. pp 19-38. HG4027.7.S28 1990 SSRR B&E
91-101176

* Strong, George F. Getting the Government To Pay for Your New Business.
San Diego, CA: National Publications, c1990. pp. 245-297, 307-318, 320-395.
HG4027.7.S86 1990 SSRR B&E
90-6408

Exporter’s Guide to Federal Resources for Small Business. 3rd rev. ed.
Washington: U.S. Small Business Administration, Office of International
Trade. U.S. G.P.O. 1992. 122p. HF1455.E935 1991
91-37967
Also on NTDB (National Trade Data Bank) CD-ROM in SSRR B&E and N&CPRR.

State Funding

# Bendah, David. Cashing In on Free State Government Money. San Diego, CA:
Lion, c1989. 209p. HG4027.7.B473 1990
89-13690

Small Business Sourcebook: the Entrepreneur’s Resource, ed. Carol A.
Schwartz. Detroit: Gale Research Inc., 1993. 2 v.
HD2346.U5S66 SSRR B&E
85-644758
Volume 2 of this publication contains a section, “State Listings,” which
gives on a state-by-state basis information on various types of assistance
to small businesses including financing and loan programs, minority
business assistance programs, incubators, and legislative assistance.

Starting and Operating a Business in [name of state], by Michael D.
Jenkins…[et al.] Sunnyvale, CA: Oasis Press. c1980-
KF1659.Z95S7 1980 LAW
80-83053

Bank Loans

Antonini, Orlando J. Getting a Business Loan: Your Step-by-Step Guide.
Menlo Park, CA: Crisp Publications, 1993. 196p.
HG1642.U5A68 1993
92-54353

Boothe, Ben B. A Banker Tells You How To Borrow All the Money You’ll Ever
Need. Chicago, IL: Contemporary Books, 1992. 298p.
HG1642.U5B66 1992
92-11227

Goldstein, Arnold S. The Complete Small Business Loan Kit. Holbrook, MA: B.
Adams, [Consumer Law Foundation], c1990. 191 p.
HG3729.U5G58 1990
90-115034

Hayes, Rick Stephen. Business Loans: A Guide to Money Sources and How To
Approach Them. rev. and updated. New York: Wiley, c1989. 297p.
HG3751.4.U6H39 1989 SSRR B&E
88-38851

Lending to Different Industries: Practical Articles on Making Loans to
Selected Industries and Businesses-A Collection Taken from the Journal of
Commercial Bank Lending. Philadelphia: R.Morris Associates. v. 1-3,
c1990-1992. HG1641.L46 1990
90-5900

Mancuso, Joseph R. How To Get A Business Loan (Without Signing Your Life
Away. New York: Prentice Hall, 1990. 270p.
HG1641.M25 1990 SSRR B&E
89-30272

Milling, Bryan E. How To Get a Loan or Line of Credit for Your Business.
Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks, Inc., 1993. 145p.
HG3751.M54 1993
92-41609

Venture Capital

Bartlett. Joseph W. A Venture Capital: Law, Business Strategies, and
Investment Planning. New York: J. Wiley, 1988. 514p.
KF1366.B37 1988 Law
87-30352

# Entrepreneur’s Guide To raising Venture Capital. Greenberg Consulting and
Craig T. Norback. Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Liberty Hall Press, c.1991. 264p.
HG4751.B87 1990
90-20624
Rev. ed. of The Arthur Young Guide To Raising Venture Capital, by G. Steven
Burrill and Craig T. Norbeck.

Gladstone, David. Venture Capital Handbook. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice
Hall, 1988. 350p. HG4965.G57 1988 SSRR B&E
87-61607

Haft, Robert J. Venture Capital and Small Business Financing. New York:
Clark Boardman Co., 1984 annual. KF1659.H33 1984 LAW
84-14514

* Henderson, James W. Obtaining Venture Financing. Lexington, MA: Lexington
Books, 1991. pp, 251-300. HG4963.H44 1988
85-40234

McGarty, Terrence P. Business Plans That Win Venture Capital. New York:
Wiley, 1989. pp. 231-318 and Appendix. HD62.5.M38 1989
88-27609

# Merrill, Ronald E. Raising Money: Venture Funding and How To Get It, by
Ronald E. Merrill and Gaylord E. Nichols. New York: American Management
Association. c1990. 283p. HG4751.M47 1990
89-46215

# Pratt’s Guide to Venture Capital Sources. Needham, MA: Venture Economics
Inc. annual. HG65.G83 SSRR B&E
85-644764

# Schilit, W. Keith. The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Preparing a Winning
Business Plan and Raising Venture Capital. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice
Hall, c1990. 287p. HG4027.6.S35 1990
88-37103

Venture Capital Manual. Boston: Warren, Gorham & Lamont, c1990. pp. B4-1 –
B4-21. HG4965.V45 1990 SSRR B&E
90-70881

Nonprofit Organizations

# Blum, Laurie. Free Money for Small Businesses and Entrepreneurs. 3rd ed.
New York: J. Wiley & Sons, c1992. 293p.
HG4027.7.B58 1992 SSRR B&E
92-19847

Examples of Sources Targeted to Specific Groups

* Berle, Gustav. Retiring to Your Own Business: How You Can Launch a
Satisfying, Productive, and Prosperous Second Career. Santa Maria, CA: Puma
Pub. c1993. pp. 21-23; 27-32, 37-39, 43-54, 57-79, 207-241, 248-249.
HD6279.B47 1993
92-22196

International Association of Black Business Educators. IABBE’s Business
Strategies. [Washington, DC]: The Association, 1988. Chapters 1, 2, 5, and
7. HD2346.U51566 1988
89-112382

Snelling, Laurine. Start Your Own Business After 50, or 60, or 70! San
Leandro, CA: Bristol Pub. Enterprises, 1990. pp. 165-179.
HD6072.6.U5S64 1990
91-143280

_________________________________________________________________

EXPORT FINANCING

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

Exporter’s Guide to Federal Resources for Small Business. 3rd rev. ed.
Washington: U.S. Small Business Administration, Office of International
Trade. U.S. G.P.O. 1992. 122p. HF1455.E935 1991
91-37967
Also on NTDB (National Trade Data Bank) CD-ROM in SSRR B&E and N&CPRR.

Gordon, John S. Profitable Exporting: A Complete Guide To Marketing Your
Products Abroad. 2nd ed. New York: Wiley, c1993. Chapters 12-13.
HF1416.5.G67 1993
92-14983

Wells, L. Fargo. Exporting: from Start to Finance by L. Fargo Wells and
Karin B. Dulat. 2nd ed. [Blue Ridge Summit, PA]: Liberty Hall Press, 1991.
522p. HF1416.5.W45 1991 SSRR B&E
91-21411

* Venedikian, H. Export-Import Financing, by H. Venedikian and G. Warfield.
3rd. ed. New York: Wiley, 1992. pp. 58-114.
HG3754.U5V46 1991
91-4771
________________________________________________________________

FINANCING FOR BUYING A BUSINESS

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

Desmond, Glenn. Handbook of Small Business Valuation Formulas and Rules of
Thumb. 3rd. ed. Camden, ME: Valuation Press. 1993. 371p.
HG4028.V3D478 1993
93-235225

Goldstein, Arnold S. Buying and Selling a Business–Successfully: A Proven
Guide for Entrepreneurs. Homewood, IL: Dow Jones Irwin, 1990. pp. 144-164.
HD1393.25.G637 1990 SSRR B&E
89-7736

McGregor, Ronald J. Buying a Business: A Step-by-Step for the First Time
Buyer. [Menlo Park, CA]: Crisp Publications, 1993. pp. 62-70.
HD1393.25.M38 1993
92-82770

Pratt, Shannon P. Valuing Small Businesses and Professional Practices. 2nd
ed. Homewood, IL: Business One Irwin, 1993. 692p.
HG4028.V3P73 1993
92-26337

* Tuller, Lawrence W. Buying In: A Complete Guide to Acquiring a Business
or Professional Practice. Blue Ridge Summit, PA: Liberty Hall Press, 1990.
pp. 128204, 219-271, 279-287.
HD1393.25.T83 1990
90-36725

Whittemore, Meg. Financing Your Franchise. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1993. pp.
5792. HF5429.235.U5W48 1993
93-14238

_________________________________________________________________

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR THE SMALL BUSINESS

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

* Bond, Cecil J. Hands-On Financial Controls for Your Small Business. Blue
Ridge Summit, PA: Liberty Hall Press, 1991. pp. 1-17, 19-51.
HG4027.7.B66 1990
90-49728

Financial Troubleshooting: An Action Plan for Money Management in the Small
Business, edited by David H. Bangs, Jr. and the editors of Common Sense.
Dover, NH: Upstart Pub. Co., c1992. -pp. 33-42, 175-180.
HG4027.7.F555 1992 SSRR B&E
92-30261

Glau, Gregory R. The Small Business Financial Planner. New York:
Wiley,1989. pp. 173- 192. HG4027.7.G57 1989
88-20759

* Parson, Mary Jean. Financially Managing the One-Person Business. New
York: Perigee Books, c1991. pp. 13-36, 51-61.
HG4027.7.P37 1991
91-6771

Schimel, Barry R. 101 Ways To Prosper in Today’s Economy. Herdon, VA:
Acropolis Books, 1991. 229p. HG4027.7.S35 1991
91-29862

_________________________________________________________________
AVOIDING SCAMS

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

Henderson, M. Allen. Rip-Offs, Cons and Swindles: Money for Nothing. Ft.
Lee, N.J.: Barricade Books, Inc., 1992. 192p.
HV6697.H46 1992
92-15881

Mott, Graham M. How To Recognize and Avoid Scams, Swindles, and Ripoffs.
Littleton, CO.: Golden Shadows Press. 1993.
HV6695.M68 1993
93-154149

Scams, Schemes, Deceptive Offers: How Small Businesses Can Survive the
Great American Rip-Offs. Washington: Call For Action (CFA), Inc., [nd]
brochure.
LC Location: BRS Business Vertical File under SCAMS

_________________________________________________________________

FREE OR INEXPENSIVE MATERIALS

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

The Small Business Administration issues a number of pamphlets, videotapes,
and other publications that discuss various issues relating to the
financing of a small business. Some representative titles are listed below.
For a current catalog, call the Small Business Administration SBA Answer
Desk at 1-800-827-5722.

“ABC’s of Borrowing.” (Series: Financial Management, FM1) How To Raise
Money for a Small Business,” (Series: Focus on the Facts, FF1)

“A Venture Capital Primer for Small Business,” (Series: Financial
Management, FM5)

The following groups also distribute free or inexpensive guides for small
business persons which may be of interest. Exact availability and cost are
subject to change.

Guides from Price Waterhouse Series for Smaller Businesses and
Entrepreneurs.

Price Waterhouse
1251 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10020
212-819-5000

Various topics are covered, including financing. These guides are also
generally available from any of the approximately ninety Price Waterhouse
offices nationwide. Check local listings to determine if there is an office
in your area.

Where To Get Start-Up Funding for Your Business.

[Income Opportunity Booklets]
Davis Publications
Income Opportunities
P.O. Box 40
Vernon, NJ 07462
800-338-7531

_________________________________________________________________

ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING SERVICES

Abstracting and indexing services provide access to relevant articles in
journals and access to other literature. The following suggested subject
terms are given as aids in searching the services listed below. All are
CD-ROMs, except as noted. Call numbers are given for those with printed
versions.

ABI Inform [CD-ROM] (1987- ) SSRR B&E
Business Periodicals Ondisc (BPO) [CD-ROM] (1987- ) N&CPRR
(BPO and ABI Inform share common indexing, but BPO also includes full text
of selected articles)

See: Corporate Finance
Entrepreneurs
Financial Management
Small Business
Startups

Classification Codes that can be used:

3100 Capital and Debt Management
9180 International
9190 United States
9520 Small Business
9521 Minority- and Women-Owned Businesses

Business Periodicals Index (1958- )Z71 64.C81 B983SSRR B&E,
MRR Alc, N&CPRR

Business Abstracts [CD-ROM] (1982- ) SSRR B&E

See: Black Business Enterprises
Entrepreneurs and Finance
New Business Enterprises and Finance
New Business Enterprises and Strategic Planning
Small Business Ownership
Small Business and State Aid
Women Entrepreneurs

Business Dateline [CD-ROM] (1985- ) SSRR B&E

See: Business Incubators
Business Incubators and Small Business
Corporate Finance and Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurs and Finance
Small Business and Financing
Startups and Financing

Ethnic Newswatch [CD-ROM] (October 1993) N&CPRR

See: Entrepreneurs and Finance
Minority Owned Businesses and Finance
Native Americans and Entrepreneurs
Small Business and Finance
Venture Capital and Small Business
Women Entrepreneurs

Infotrac General Business File [CD-ROM] (1993- ) SSRR B&E

See: Black Business Enterprises — finance
Businessmen — finance
Businesswomen — finance
Entrepreneurship — business incubators
Entrepreneurship– finance
Handicapped — business and industry
Minority Business Enterprises — finance
Native Americans — business and industry
New Business Enterprises — finance

Newspaper Abstracts Ondisc [CD-ROM] (1989- ) N&CPRR

See: Entrepreneurs and Finance
Minority Owned Businesses and Finance
Small Business and Finance
Venture Capital and Small Business
Women and Entrepreneurs

NTDB: National Trade Data Bank [CD-ROM] (1993- ) SSRR B&E, N&CPRR

On Disc 1, from main menu select “program”, then select options relating to
small business financing such as:

“A Basic Guide to Exporting”

— Appendix III contains state and local sources of
assistance.

“Opportunity in Mexico: A Small Business Guide”

“SBA News and Loan Programs”

On Disc 2, from main menu select “program”, then choose options as
appropriate such as:

“Breaking into the Trade Game: Small Business Guide to
Exporting”

“Export Programs: A Business Directory of US Government
Resources”

“State Trade Contacts”

PAIS International (1991- ) Z7164.E2P34 SSRR B&E, MRR Alc,
N&CPR

PAIS International [CD-ROM] (1972- ) MRR

See: Entrepreneurs and Finance
Minority Business Enterprises
Small Business and Finance
(Small Business) and (Export Import Trade)
Venture Capital

Readers’ Guide To Periodical Literature (1900- ) AI13.R48
MRR ALC, SSRR B&E, N&CPRR

Readers’ Guide [CD-ROM] (1983- ) N&CPRR

See: Black Business Enterprises
Entrepreneurs
Entrepreneurs and Finance
Minority Business Enterprises
Small Business and finance
Venture Capital
Women Entrepreneurs
_________________________________________________________________

PERIODICALS

D&B Reports. ISSN: 0746-6110
HF5001.D86a
80-642262

Entrepreneur. ISSN: 0364-7218
HF5001.E64
76-648309

In Business. ISSN: 0190-2458
HF5001.I35
79-643446

Income Opportunities. ISSN 0019-3429
HF5382.5.U515
58-36003

Inc. ISSN: 0162-8968
HD2346.U5 155
79-643168

Journal of Small Business Management. ISSN: 0047-2778
(National Council for Small Business Management Development)
HD69.S6 J67
72-628049

Nation’s Business. ISSN: 0028-047X
(Chamber of Commerce of the United States) HF1.N4
(micro 06239 1912- )
15-18456

Small Business Investment Companies Digest / (SBIC Digest)
ISSN: 0149-2500
(Small Business Administration, Investment Division)
HG3729.U5A3392c
76-649841

Small Business Reports. ISSN: 0164-5382
(American Management Association) HD2346.U5 S64
82-640992

You and Your Business. ISSN: 0736-4865
HG4027.7.Y68
84-643803

Venture Capital Journal. ISSN: 0883-2773
HG4961.V465
85-645612
_________________________________________________________________

REPRESENTATIVE JOURNAL ARTICLES

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

BC = Business Collection BPO = Business Periodicals Ondisc

MC = Magazine Collection GPO= General Periodicals Ondisc

* “Asset-Based Lending is Safe and Sound Lending,” Secured Lender,
January-February 1993: p. 69-75.
Written from the point of view of the lender.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO
HF5565.C65

* Bhide, Amar. “Bootstrap Finance: The Art of Start-ups,” Harvard Business
Review, v. 70 n. 6 November-December 1992: p. 109-117.

Full Text in N&CPRR on BC
HF5001.H3

* Black Entrepreneurs: Have Capital, Will Flourish,” Economist, February
27, 1993: p. 33-34.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO and GPO
HG11.E2

* Broome, J. Tol Jr. “How To Write a Business Plan,” Nation’s Business,
February 1993: p. 29-30.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1.N4

* Brown, Caryne. “Making Low-Cost Start-Ups Pay Off,” Black Enterprise,
November 1992: p. 65-72.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
E185.B5

* “Capital Suggestions: Assets and Barter,” Nation’s Business, v 80, April
1992: p. 3435.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1.N4

* Davidson, Jacqueline.” International Strategies: Putting Wind in Your
Sales,” Small Business Reports, v. 17, July 1992: p. 44-48.
Discusses types of financing available through the Eximbank for small
companies interested in exporting.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO
HD2346.U5S64

*Davis, Eileen. “Creative Financing Techniques,” Small Business Reports, v.
16, December 1991: p. 49-58.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO
HD2346.U5S64

Emshwiller, John R. “Entrepreneurs are Tempting Targets for Fraud,” Wall
Street Journal, January 12, 1994. pp. B1-B2.
Newspaper
N&CPRR

* “Financing Export Transactions,” Business America, World Trade Week
Edition. v. 113, n. 9 [May] 1992: p. 14-16.
HF1.B863

* “The `Good’ Banker”, Inc., v. 15 February 1993: p. 31.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HD2346.U5155

* Hartnet, Michael. “So You Want To Get a Bank Loan: New Franchise Owners
Have a Friend in the SBA,” Restaurant Business, v. 91, March 20, 1992: p.
68-69.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC and BPO
TP628.S7

* John, Christine. “Rural America Fund Foster New Jobs in Rural Areas,”
Management Quarterly, v. 33, Summer 1992: p. 33-35.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO
HD28.M14

* McKee, Bradford. “Seed Funds for the Smallest Start-Ups,” Nation’s
Business, October 1992: p. 29-30.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1.N4

* McKee, Bradford. “Simpler Offerings for Smaller Firms,” Nation’s
Business, July 1993: p. 33-34
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1. N4

* Nelton, Sharon. “On the Horizon: More Investment in Women,” Nation’s
Business, v. 81, May 1993: p. 73-74.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1.N4

* Payne, Kay. “Funding Small Businesses Through Private Economic
Development Organizations,” Economic Development Review, Winter 1992: p.
89-91.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO

* Posner, Bruce G. “How To Finance Anything,” Inc., v. 15, February 1993:
p. 54-68.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HD2346.U5155

* “Small Companies in Quest of Cash Face More Grilling Than Ever,” Profit
Building Strategies for Business Owners, v. 22, no. 11, November 1992: p.
3-4.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC

*Stern, Linda. “Need $10,000? $50,000? $250,000?” Home Office Computing, v.
10, September 1992: p. 64-69.
Full Text in N&CPRR on GPO
QA76.5.F328

* Szabo, Joan C. “A Capital Option: Finance Companies,” Nation’s Business,
July 1992: p. 42.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HF1.N4

* Szabo, Joan C. “Easing Small Firms’ Credit Crunch,” Nation’s Business, v.
80, June 1993: p. 42-43.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, and GPO
HF1.N4

* “Tapping a Credit Union,” Inc.,v. 14, December 1992: p. 35.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HD2346.U5155

* “Tapping the Microlenders,” Inc., November 1992: p. 43.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HD2346.U5155

* Thompson, Kevin D. “Facing Tough Times on the Money Trail,” Black
Enterprise, January 1993: p. 72-76.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO and MC
E185.8.B5

Thompson, Kevin D. “Beating Small Business Scams,” Black Enterprise, v. 24,
October 1993: p. 25.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO and MC
E185.8.B5

* Touby, Laurel. “The New Bankrolls Behind Women’s Businesses,” Business
Week, September 21, 1992: p. 70-71.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BPO and GPO
HF5001. B89

* Washer, Louise. “How To Finance a Start-Up,” Working Woman, v. 17,
October 1992: p. 43–49, 63.
Full Text in N&CPRR on BC, BPO, GPO, and MC
HQ1101.W78

_________________________________________________________________

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION

SYMBOLS:

* Available in “BRS Small Business Collection” in SSRR B&E.
# indicates that a photocopy of the title page and table of
contents of the publication is available.

Anderson, Robert L. Managing Small Businesses, by Robert L. Anderson and
John S. Dunkelberg. Minneapolis/St. Paul: West Pub., 1993. pp. 166-190.
HD62.7.A515 1993
92-26315

Arden, Lynie. The Work-at-Home Sourcebook, 4th ed. Boulder, CO: Live Oak
Publications. c1992. 279p. HD2336.U5A73 1992
91-30758

Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance. Washington, Office of Management
and Budget, for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Office, 1991-
annual.
HC110.P63U53a SSRR Ref Desk
73-600118
Issued to depository libraries in microfiche.
Supt. of Docs. No.: PrEx 2.20:

Corporate Finance Sourcebook. Wilmette, IL: National Register Co.
annual. HG4057.A1565 SSRR B&E
79-642719

Credit Considerations: Financial and Credit Characteristics of Selected
Industries. Philadelphia, PA: Robert Morris Associates, 1986. 3v.
HG1641.C663 1990
89-13778

# Directory of Operating Small Business Investment Companies, Washington:
Small Business Administration. 19- semiannual, June and December.
HG3729.U49D57 SSRR B&E
82-647180
Lists approximately 570 small business investment companies
licensed under the Small Business Investment Act covering
minority enterprise SBIC’s.

Issued also to depository libraries in microfiche. Supt. of
Docs. No.: SBA1.2:D 62/2/ Supt. of Docs. No.:SBA 1.13/4:Op 1/

The Home Business Resource Guide. ed. Cheryl Gorder. Tempe, AZ: Blue Bird
Pub. c1989. 144p. HD2336.U5G65 SSRR B&E
89-18205

* Mancuso, Joseph R. Mancuso’s Small Business Resource Guide. New York:
Prentice Hall 1988. pp. 45-52; 517-533.
HD62.7.M367 1988 SSRR B&E
87-27015

* Morton, Thomas. Financial Letters for the Small Business. New York:
Wiley, 1992. pp. 47-112. HF5721.M73 1992
91-39892

Pike, Gene. Profiles in Independence: Starting a Home-Based Business.
Valrico, FL: Sherwood Pub., 1992. pp. 29-62.
HD62.5.P55 1992
92-138099

Pratt’s Guide to Venture Capital Sources. Wellesley Hills, Mass.: Venture
Economics, Inc., 1984 annual. HG65.G83 SSRR B&E
85-644764
Includes an industry preference index as well as a brief guide
to preparing a business plan. Has a companion publication
1985- : Guide to European Venture Capital Sources.

Small Business Sourcebook: the Entrepreneur’s Resource, ed. Carol A.
Schwartz. Detroit: Gale Research Inc., 1993. 2 v.
HD2346.U5S66 SSRR B&E
85-644758

For each state, lists small business assistance programs,
financing and loan Programs, minority business assistance
programs, procurement assistance programs, incubators and
research and technology parks, legislative assistance, and
consultants. Also includes chapters on “Venture Capital and
Other Funding,” “Government Assistance, and “Financial
Management” which list associations, educational programs,
reference works, trade periodicals, videocassettes and
audiocassettes, consultants, computerized databases, and
research centers.

About author

SMB Reviews
SMB Reviews 473 posts

SMBReviews is committed to providing small and mid-sized business owners with the information and resources they need to select the best service or product for their company.

You might also like

Articles

Is Franchising for You? – Identifying the Franchisor’s Responsibilities

An important step in making an informed decision about purchasing a franchise is to know the responsibilities the franchisor is legally obligated to fulfill. One of the toughest decisions any

Articles

How to Value Your Business

Several times during the life of a company, you’ll need to value its worth. A brand-new company may need an angel investor who asks for an accurate estimate of your

Articles

Does Your Small Business Need a Mobile App

Choosing whether or not to go with a mobile app for your business isn’t an easy decision. More users are moving away from laptops and desktops to mobile devices that

0 Comments

No Comments Yet!

You can be first to comment this post!